Quantcast
Previous month:
March 2013
Next month:
May 2013

April 2013

Maria Creyts

Maria CreytsArtist Maria Creyts creates extraordinarily long photos depicting subjects she designs from textiles.  Her works are concerned with hand-sewn garments as subjects in same-scale photography.  Large photo compositions and the clothing subjects themselves are often exhibited together with the matching image and subject just out of view of each other.  Complete ensembles suspended on hangers seem like mysterious gallery goers whose boldly patterned dress outshines the individual to the point that we do not see him or her at all.

In 2012 the artist focused on custom clothing design while preparing an African-themed fashion collection for Kansas City’s West 18th Street Fashion Show.  Through this, she acquired further skill in sewing and explored how clothing design and construction could help in planning a purpose for her sewn subjects beyond the photo shoot.

During December and January 2011-2012, Creyts spent time learning batik techniques in Nigeria under artist Niké Davies Okundaye with the goal of introducing the artist’s own hand into her photo friezes through designing fabrics for photography subjects.  For the menswear ensemble she photoed, Creyts used hot wax to draw and print imagery on 7 yards of seersucker.  The motif used unites the amusing story of her visit to an African palace with traditional Nigerian stencil designs that portray a European royal couple.


About the artist

Maria Creyts is a graduate of Yale University School of Art and her studio, ESTUDIO mariaurora, is in Kansas City, Missouri.  The artist’s photo friezes have stretched over walls at the Visual Arts Gallery of the University of Lagos, Nigeria (2012), Leedy-Voulkos Art Center in Kansas City (2011), and Centro Fotográfico Manuel Álvarez Bravo in Oaxaca, Mexico (2010).  In "Panoramic Patterns” (Kansas City Star, 4/21/2011), critic Dana Self described the artist as "...a curious media traveler, someone who refuses to let a material’s limitations or its nature stand in the way of her inquisitiveness.”  artist website:  http://mariaurora.net


Marcelino Vicente

Mexican potteryIn the rural Mexican state of Michoacán, devils, mermaids, saints, sun gods, and drunks can all be found mixing it up and having a great time. Each of these characters, and many more, inhabit the strange universe depicted in sculptures produced in the tiny town of Ocumicho.

These bizarre pottery tableaux feature hybrid scenes from everyday life, religious allegories, and native folklore, all borne from the mind of a unique young man named Marcelino Vicente. Resembling Hieronymus Bosch’s nightmarish landscapes from the 1500s, but with a Catholic-folk art twist, these ceramic fantasies are found nowhere else. Yet during the 1960s, Vicente’s eccentric lifestyle was perceived as a threat to the town’s social hierarchy, which ultimately destroyed him for being different.

Don Lewis, an artist and collector of Mexican folk art, says the strangeness of Ocumicho pottery first caught his eye in a Santa Fe antiques shop nearly 20 years ago. “Just the life in it, the colors, the craziness of it,” says Lewis. Before he knew it, Lewis was purchasing Ocumicho pieces to decorate his home.

“The first one I ever bought was very simple, nothing too weird about it. It was just two people—a woman and a man—out in an agave field, picking agave to make tequila. The second one was like a man in the moon, but it’s more of a sun face with really sharp teeth. Then another one came along, and I started noticing the devils.” These miniature devil figures, or diablitos, are a particularly striking element of Ocumicho sculptures.

 


Ashes57

ASHES57Ashes57 is a graphic artist who has lived and worked in the UK, Canada and the United States. Her artistic career began in earnest in 2003 when she moved from London to Montreal. Surrounded by the city’s large musical and artistic community, she was able to focus exclusively on creative projects and developed her unique line drawing style and vector graphics.

Ashes spent the summer of 2005 working with Shepard Fairey in his Los Angeles de-sign studio, where the richly creative atmosphere proved an enormous source of inspiration. She worked on a number of Obey exhibitions and street art projects in the following years and her photography documenting these experiences has been included in publications such as Arkitip and Supply and Demand – The Art of Shephard Fairey and has also been displayed at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. Later in 2005, Ashes moved to New York to work as the Art Director of COOL’EH Magazine, a role which combines her passions for illustration, graphic design and typography. As dubstep first made its way to NYC, she soon became an important part of this exciting new musical scene through the flyers and posters she produced for the legendary Dub War parties. When Ashes returned to London in 2008, she joined forces with some of the most influential and prominent producers and labels in the scene and her illustrations and designs have since graced labels including Deep Medi, Swamp 81 and DMZ. This helped to bring her art to the attention of the Wu-Tang Clan who invited Ashes to illustrate the cover of their 2009 album Enter the Dubstep. Towards the end of 2009, she co-founded the LAVA Collective.