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July 2013

Chris Soria

Chris soriaChris Soria is a fine artist who works in photomontage, painting, and ephemeral sculpture.

Soria's photomontages consist of layered photographs, cut and pasted in plexiglass. His work chronicles the decay of abandoned factories and explores the transformation of neglected industry. In a series of time-lapsing documentary works, Soria collages thousands of photographs to rebuild fallen complexes, reconstructing locations and revealing the succession of nature over time as they transform in the changing seasons and weather. Where and when pluralize, time separates, space is replaced, and everything becomes an record of what is past.

A muralist and public artist, Soria has created large scale murals and public works of art for numerous institutions, schools, universities, and private and public spaces internationally. As an educator, Soria is a Lead Artist with Groundswell, bringing together artists, youth, and community organizations, using art as a tool for social change. Email Chris Soria at chrissoria@gmail.com .

Roger Ballen

Roger Ballen Roger Ballen was born in New York City, New York, USA in 1950. He has lived in Johannesburg since the 1970s. Beginning by documenting the small dorps or villages of rural South Africa, Ballen starting photographing the inhabitants of these places in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

He transformative work capture an almost Diane Arbus effect on his subjects. They draw you in but can often repel.

"I have been shooting black and white film for nearly fifty years now. I believe I am part of the last generation that will grow up with this media. Black and White is a very minimalist art form and unlike color photographs does not pretend to mimic the world in a manner similar to the way the human eye might perceive. Black and White is essentially an abstract way to interpret and transform what one might refer to as reality. My purpose in taking photographs over the past forty years has ultimately been about defining myself. It has been fundamentally a psychological and existential journey. If an artist is one who spends his life trying to define his being, I guess I would have to call myself an artist."


William Baziotes

William baziolesWilliam Baziotes was a New York painter whose work dealt with the shadowy and mysterious realm of mythic subject matter and the human unconscious. Like his Abstract Expressionist peers, he was deeply committed to concerns of paint, color, and abstracted forms. But under the influence of Surrealism and other European traditions, his work took on a more lyrical and enigmatic character.

Baziotes' early career demonstrates just how large a role Surrealism played in the formation of the painters who would later be called Abstract Expressionists. One of Baziotes' early group shows was the First Papers of Surrealism exhibition in New York in 1942. Surrealism argued for a reliance on "automatic" gestures, random marks or brushstrokes that bypassed the rational intentions of the artist. In this way, deeper, psychic meanings could be expressed. The Chilean Surrealist painter Roberto Matta was a big proponent of automatic painting, incorporating drips, swirls, and other "accidents" into his abstract compositions, and he exerted a large influence on Baziotes.

This interest in the psychic and subconscious dimension also manifested itself in the odd, lyrical forms that populate Baziotes' paintings. These range from irregular geometric star and flower shapes, often with black contours in the early work, to smooth and glowing abstracted figures in the later work. To some extent these forms derive from Surrealism and other European influences - the French painter Joan MirĂ³ in particular was an inspiration. But it was also part of a distinctly Abstract Expressionist riff on such traditions. Many New York painters, including Baziotes, Adolph Gottlieb, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko turned to what they deemed primitive or mythological forms in an attempt to get at a more universal significance. The modern world, rife with superficial distractions and the terrors of war, Depression, and nuclear threat, offered little in the way of meaningful subject matter. Mythic tales and ideographic forms, by contrast, had been means of human expression since time immemorial. - See more at this link

 

William Baziotes was a New York painter whose work dealt with the shadowy and mysterious realm of mythic subject matter and the human unconscious. Like his Abstract Expressionist peers, he was deeply committed to concerns of paint, color, and abstracted forms. But under the influence of Surrealism and other European traditions, his work took on a more lyrical and enigmatic character.
- See more at: http://www.theartstory.org/artist-baziotes-william.htm#sthash.QtN2m9iC.dpuf
William Baziotes was a New York painter whose work dealt with the shadowy and mysterious realm of mythic subject matter and the human unconscious. Like his Abstract Expressionist peers, he was deeply committed to concerns of paint, color, and abstracted forms. But under the influence of Surrealism and other European traditions, his work took on a more lyrical and enigmatic character.
- See more at: http://www.theartstory.org/artist-baziotes-william.htm#sthash.QtN2m9iC.dpuf