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August 2013
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October 2013

September 2013

James Prez

Jim Prez's 'book-tures' (sculptures comprised of a book base with found objects artfully fastened atop) make inspired use of thrift store bric-a-brac and second-hand books.

Booktures and book reserves

What is your background in art-making?

I have been making things since grade school but very early on I took to photography and worked on making photographs for many years. I don't have an art degree from college but I did get an MFA in Photographic Studies from Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, NY. Much of my background in art comes from looking at books from libraries in the various cities that I have lived in. I have tried to make at least one thing every day since 1977.

What was the inspiration for the idea of creating these booktures?

I was visiting the Philadelphia Museum of Art and noticed that there were more people waiting in line to have their pictures taken with the Rocky Statue than were going to the museum. I figured that I could make more interesting works for people to visit and be photograhed in front of than the Rocky bronze so I started working on maquettes for monumental sculptures. The "booktures" came directly from that idea.

Who are some of your artistic (or other) influences?

I try not to be influenced by other artists' work but I surely do love looking at other artists' work. There are so many that it would be difficult to name them all. Of course I would have to list Vincent van Gogh, Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Cornell, Robert Rauschenberg, Joan Mitchell, Georgia O'Keefe, Lee Krasner, Yayoi Kusama, Howard Finster, James Castle and Richard Tuttle. I have been fascinated by the work of Suzanne Goldenberg for the past few years. Her work is pure magic. I love artists who make work but aren't concerned with selling, showing or getting reviewed. Work that comes from the heart and soul.

Does the title of the book play any role in what gets put on top of it?

The title of the book rarely plays a role in the book. I wish I was smarter and more clever in that regard. The book, however, is the point of departure for the work. I play off its shape, size and color.

Bookture and Book Display

Where do you find your found art?

I spent a year looking for the raw materials, for my booktures, in thrift stores, junk stores, and at the Salvation Army, garage sales, church sales, library sales, stoop sales and on the street.

I also visited the Strand two or three times a week during that year. I took another two years to assemble and photograph the booktures. There are approximately 250 of them. I stopped making them but did make three new ones for the Mulberry Library show.

Obviously your work includes books—was this your motivation for displaying work in libraries?

Yes, absolutely. The library is free and open to all. I like that idea very much!

Where else do you show your work?

I show my work in galleries, museums, artist spaces and on the street.

I like to post things on Facebook also. Printed Matter has been selling my bookverks since 1988. I will have had 25 years of bookmaking and finished my 500th book by the year's end. (2013)


Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt

Thomas Lanigan-SchmidtA pop-cultural connoisseur with a magpie’s eye for what shimmers and shines, Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt has been using plastic wrap, reflective foil, colored beads, pipe cleaners, glitter, staples and photographs for more than 40 years to create shrines to saints, sacred and secular, emblematic of queer identity. He includes himself among the elect in an early collage titled “Twinky as a Prima Ballerina (Self-Portrait),” completed in 1969, the year of the Stonewall Rebellion, in which he participated.

Lanigan-Schmidt began by exhibiting his art in his own apartment; an early major exhibit in 1969 was titled The Sacristy of the Hamptons. Another home exhibit was titled The Summer Palace of Czarina Tatlina.  In these early home exhibits, and also in at least one later recreation of an early exhibit, he guided visitors through the exhibit in drag in character as art collector Ethel Dull.

While Lanigan Schmidt's art is not widely known, he has received critical acclaim.

Reasons for Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt's art not reaching a wider audience totally elude me. This is major, major work, reflecting and augmenting today's dialogue in a unique and commanding voice. Many artists, including a generation of Lanigan-Schmidt's students, have been repeatedly amazed, inspired and guided by its panache, rapier-sharp wit, subversiveness and opulent beauty.

—Robert Kushner, Art in America

 

 


Lorna Barnshaw

Lorna BarnshawPassionate about the world of photography, Lorna Barnshaw is devoted to celluloid film, but more explicitly to camera-less techniques. She offers an usual medium - 3D printing - to create her art.

“Photographers were supposed to do more than just see the world as it is…they were to create interest, by new visual decisions.” (Sontag., 1979)

Barnshaw creates through a means of destruction, employing the material nature of celluloid film that allows it burn, blister, mark and contort, producing abstract still and moving images. By utilizing some sensitive compounds it became possible to create true motion from a singular image, as opposed to the illusion of motion generated by a series of images propelled at 24fps. In the ‘Still Movement’ series, motion was created with an application of wax that melted and morphed with the heat generated from the lamp of a slide projector.

The work explores the current coexistence of analogue and digital mediums in both film and photography. Taking advantage of the materiality of celluloid film and the ethereal elements of digital, the two are united portraying a sense of nostalgia whilst welcoming the future of technology. True motion can only exist in reality or analogue format but it is digital that enables the work to exist everywhere. Key influences include artist, Tacita Dean and filmmaker, George Melies.

In her recent series she explores the latest innovations in 3D printing and augmented reality that  morph the human form to become even more realistic and somehow magical. Mask-like human face sculptures form the ‘Replicants’ series. The series is inspired by creating digital simulacrums of the physical world. Barnhaw’s passion for the convergence of digital art and sculpting has led her to created a triptych of 3D Prints that represent human faces. Each facial sculpture has a different aesthetic depending on the different computer applications and software used in its creation, such as Autodesk, 3D scanning or computer animation. “I interfered with the software as little as possible, comparing the digital attempts at replicating reality”, Barnshaw expresses in her website.


Christian Rosa

ChristianrosaflyerChristian Rosa, born 1982 in Sao Paolo, has been active and living in Vienna, Austria, since graduating from Akademie der bildenden Künste (2007–2012) where he studied under Daniel Richter.

Christian Rosa is an artist who works across media but collage and painting are at the center of his practice. Rosa employs an approach to painting that reduces decision making to the limitations of his physical actions. There is an ongoing struggle to unlearn and rediscover, in which each piece is like a moment isolated from an ever-changing surface. Through this process, Rosa deconstructs, reconfigures and explores the future possibilities of the moment of failure.

Christian Rosa is one of the prominent young artists working in Vienna whose energy and practice have an important role in the growing scene in which he is involved. Rosa not only exhibits as an artist but curates and organises exhibitions, events, screenings and publications. Recent exhibitions that Christian Rosa has exhibited in includes: ReMap, Athens; Brucennial 2012, New York; NeoSI: neue Situationistische Internationale, Kunstraum Schattendorf, DE; Blind Sculpture, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York; and Vienna Biennale 2010, Künstlerhaus, Vienna.