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Artists M-S

Shinichi Sawada

Shinichi SawadaShinichi Sawada is a ceramic artist who creates unique and mystical figures with great detail and delicacy.

Born in 1982, Sawada started attending Shiga Prefecture (a local social welfare facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) three or four times a week from around the year 2000. At this time he also started creating his ceramic art works at a kiln-equipped pottery workshop up in the mountains. This was only feasible during the spring and summer months due to severe winter weather conditions affecting the ceramics.

Sawada is a prolific artist taking around four days to complete each ceramic piece. When Sawada works, he demonstrates such confidence and assuredness that it seems he has already envisioned how his final pieces will look. With his delicate fingers, he applies each ‘thorn’ onto the main body of the piece without showing any kind of hesitation and always works in silence. These ‘thorns’ have evolved over time, becoming denser and more rounded. Sawada often has them laid out in straight orderly lines across the pieces too.

Being autistic with little communication means that his works and their ‘thorns’ remain a mystery to us. There are however around fifteen different motifs that he looks to replicate each time but, saying this, each finished product is totally unique.

Sawada’s work is now in the Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne and featured in the Venice Biennale in 2013.


Christopher Russell

IMG_7482Ceramicist Christopher Russell

has changed his approach to pottery. Previously he concnetrated on large scale, highly detailed sculptures. Now his work is of single, low fire vessels.  

"Spending a lot of time looking at things is one of the privileges of working as as artist. For me, drawing and sculpting are extended processes of looking, of studying, of understanding. This gives me the opportunity to sit with, and really see, whatever it is around me that interests me, be it an insect, or a decorative object, or a landscape. Drawing and sculpting are both my chance to look at a subject and, then, to say to someone else, "This is amazing, you have got to see this." I like to think that the time, care, and focus that I put into understanding a subject, and then into portraying that subject, bring people in, to share what I am looking at and marveling at. This can happen on an intimate scale, with a small wall piece inspired by the incredible structure of a grain of pollen. It can also happen on a wider, community scale. In my project for MTA Arts for Transit and Urban Design, "Bees for Sunset Park", I tried to give to the passing city traveler a moment to think about the beautiful intricacy of nature, and maybe to remember that they are part of the natural world, and, with all the bustling about, not that different from Nature's other inhabitants. This show and tell is a central pleasure of my work."


Julie Mardin

Julie mardin Julie Mardin is a New York based photographer who gives the viewer a fuller look at object whether snow globes, dolls, artists or a range of other subjects. 

She says, "I have used toys in my work for many years. I find that it helps to approach difficult issues and what feel like daunting problems. This image grew out of a series that photo collages souvenir dolls in and around New York, the city I was born and grew up in, celebrating our diversity and our heritage, though oftentimes questioning what it is we consider progress. The location, a well known superfund site, illustrates the toxic legacy that many residential communities live with throughout the borough of Brooklyn. The doll and the various props celebrate the regenerative spirit I have seen in Bushwick, one that I imagine can only continue to strengthen, through its combination of art, science, sensual pleasures, and practical environmentalism. The souvenir doll also makes reference to the refugee crisis, making one wonder at the interconnections between resource wars and the spent state of our own backyard, and how studying both together could lead to synergistic solutions. I think this brings up another natural role for the Bushwick creative and ecological collectives, one that encourages more events and voices from these regions of conflict, as we are in the midst of the largest human displacement ever recorded, and there is such a big hole in our understanding from the main stream media."


David Molesky

David moleskyDavid Molesky is an internationally recognized fine artist based in New York City known for his landscapes and figurative works.
 
David has a self-proclaimed preoccupation with the magic of painting; the way a gooey substance is transformed to an illusionary image that arouses states of contemplation and empathy.
 
His representational paintings of humans and environments have been featured in many museum exhibitions including: the Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Pasinger Fabrik, Germany; Casa Dell’Architettura, Italy; and Telemarksgaleriet, Norway. David’s paintings are in the permanent collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art among other museum collections on both coasts and in Europe and Asia. He is the recipient of artist residencies through the Morris Graves Foundation, California; Fine Art Base, California; and the Fundacja Nakielska, Poland. Many publications have featured Molesky and his paintings including, to name a few: LA Times,The Washington Post, OC Weekly, New American Painting, Hi-Fructose, and Juxtapoz.

David Molesky

David moleskyDavid Molesky is an internationally recognized fine artist based in New York City known for his landscapes and figurative works.
 
David has a self-proclaimed preoccupation with the magic of painting; the way a gooey substance is transformed to an illusionary image that arouses states of contemplation and empathy.
 
His representational paintings of humans and environments have been featured in many museum exhibitions including: the Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Pasinger Fabrik, Germany; Casa Dell’Architettura, Italy; and Telemarksgaleriet, Norway. David’s paintings are in the permanent collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art among other museum collections on both coasts and in Europe and Asia. He is the recipient of artist residencies through the Morris Graves Foundation, California; Fine Art Base, California; and the Fundacja Nakielska, Poland. Many publications have featured Molesky and his paintings including, to name a few: LA Times,The Washington Post, OC Weekly, New American Painting, Hi-Fructose, and Juxtapoz.

Brandi Martin

Brandi Martin Brandi Martin uses poetry to inform her art. She says, "The slurry grammar of the social networking used to bother me. But soon I found myself wanting to do the same. Why? I found that complete thoughts were drained of emotion. Phrased like evocative definitions of an unnamed something, in the voice of the second person, this shredding of language denies the academic third person; it feels visceral.  

I tried diagramming it old school style. Breaking it up and rebuilding it again felt educational and metaphorical at the same time. 

The ongoing nature of how we change language as it changes us. The fixed rules are actually temporal, and it’s our play with language as it flows past us that really remakes it.  A few words on a card cut off from a sentence is poignant, it could end any way, we easily insert our lives into just three words. Less gives more. The fragmented sentences and phrases in my works are not broken instead of whole, they are open instead of closed. Every day we break the authority of text- and the shards aren’t the waste; they are how we enter into the conversation."

Brandi Martin's research-based practice delves into the the quiet crises of analysis and translation. Her work challenges the authority of any singular medium or moment by transparently layering imagery, media, and time. 

Martin classifies these works as ‘metacognitive objects’. Connections and conflicts between self-referential elements create a rich friction for extended engagement, highlighting the viewers’ own thought processes. 

Inspired by the poetry and mechanics of instructional methods, as well as the evocative qualities of found objects, Martin's most recent work refers to the photographic canon, the use of second person voice as applied to art, the poetics of broken language in ‘memes’, and searching out the indexical trace in the mundane.

Brandi Martin holds an MFA From the School of Visual arts in NYC. She makes sculpture, video, images and installations that struggle to resolve conflicting narratives. Brandi lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She is the recipient of residency awards in Gorna Lipitsa, Bulgaria (funded by the Cultural Heritage and Contemporary Arts Programme of the EEA) and The Bridgeguard Residency between the Mária Valéria bridge between Štúrovo, Slovakia, and Esztergom, Hungary (funded by the Štefan and Viera Frühauf Endowment Fund).  


Marcel Sternberger

Kahlo-684x1024 Marcel Sternberger photographed the likes of Sigmund Freud, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, Albert Einstein, and George Bernard Shaw. His portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt is the basis for the president’s likeness on the dime. And yet, his name was forgotten, until a young photography and antiquarian book dealer named Jacob Loewentheil discovered his photographs, abandoned in storage.

Sternberger was born in 1899. He fled his native Hungary due to antisemitism, only to wind up in Nazi Germany. He and his wife, Ilse, were detained by the Gestapo, but made it out of the country in 1933. They moved to Antwerp, where he became the Belgian Royal Family’s official photographer. As war engulfed Europe, Sternberger moved to London, before emigrating to the US, where he was enlisted to take FDR’s official portrait.

“In his heyday, world leaders and preeminent persons recognized him as the leading portrait photographer of his generation,” Loewentheil told American Photo.The artist traveled the US and Mexico, photographing numerous luminaries, his work appearing in international newspapers, on book covers, and postage stamps. In his travels, he became close friends with Rivera and Kahlo, returning time and time again to the couple’s Mexico City home, la Casa Azul.

Sternberger’s method for producing emotive portraits that captured his sitter’s personality involved what he called “The Psychology of Portrait Photography.” Described by the New York Times as “a unique blend of psychological and photographic techniques,” the methodology involved conversing with his subjects before immortalizing them with a handheld Leica 35mm camera.

 

Article from artnet.


Leo Manso

Leo mansoAs a young man, open to the influences of the late 30’s and 40’s [Leo Manso] found social realism too doctrinaire. He was drawn to color as a major means of expression, and sought to master the understanding of color and its usage through the study of Persian Miniatures, the Siennese masters, Klee, Matisse, Bonnard, and the folk arts of many cultures. Early awareness of Sung masters showed him the bridge between East and West, for to him they had achieved the same ambient space, light and atmosphere as Turner and Monet. [Manso] sought an art of transcendence approached through meditative participitation.

In 1947 Manso set up his summer studio and home in Provincetown. He helped organize Gallery 256, the first artists regional cooperative of that era. Among it’s members were Barnet, Botkin, Browne, Busa, Campbell, Candell, and Daphnis. The gallery acted as a Salon des Refuses, encouraging exhibitions, lectures and discussions by artists not in sympathy with the Provincetown Art Association’s more academic jury system.

As early as 1948 Manso had exhibited with avant-garde groups. During that same year he helped organize the “Formations” group in New York, exhibiting with Ferren, Lipton and Marca-Relli. He was active in the American Abstract Artists exhibitions which included, among others, Albers and Ben Nicholson. Through the film maker and photographer Thomas Bouchard he came to know Kurt Seligman and Fernand Leger.

In discussing Manso’s early work he insists that it be described as “Abstract Impressionism” because of his interest in light and atmosphere, but for me there are affinities with the Abstract Expressionism of many of the artists he knew at the time. A powerful movement was underway, which owed a great deal of its strength to a meeting of the minds, at least on the surface. One of the principal ideas of this new art was to encourage multiple interpretations. The viewer as well as the artist were free to evoke imagery from the unconscious.

[Manso’s] earliest paintings were subjective and autobiographical, based on personal reaction to nature. In this he had much in common with the plein air artists and the Impressionists, but unlike them he did not seek to capture the visible. He painted what nature evoked, concretizing his emotion. Resonances, echoes, memories, stirred by direct confrontation with nature were his concern. And so, his work, lyric in spirit, was filled with light, air, enveloping space.

Manso speaks of the impact of Turner and Monet, how Turner makes the viewer part of the vision, not as observer, but as a participant in the vast drama of nature. Monet, in his late paintings produces similar sensations, for in his Nympheas series there is no horizon, no base. It is as though one is in the experience, an existential position.

In his early period, seeking to express himself, Manso, like Jacob with the Angel, wrestled with his ego. In the second period he [modified] this by submerging himself in the collective symbolism of Eastern thought. In the NOW, Manso, like Kandinsky, is in the closest possible touch with the spiritual in art.


Nadia Martinez

Nadia MartinezArtists take risks in their materials but Nadia Martinez and her work with computer parts must deal with a larger array of potentially unhealthy materials. And yet, her sculptures, constructed with these discarded parts hold a certain poignancy and presence. She says, "El Bosque de Qualtron (Qualtron’s forest). - Qualtron was the name of a computer parts manufacturing company that went bankrupt after 20 years in business. I found an inherent beauty in the abandoned parts and created a forest out of the 100% man-made materials giving them a second life. Every sculpture represents something from nature, an animal, a tree, water, etc. or a memories from Honduras."

Her work has taken her to the Museum of Art and Design  in New York City where she is an artist in residence every Friday until mid 2016. The museum notes that --

Nadia Martinez works in a variety of mediums, with her work reflecting on daily encounters and experiences that are often difficult to express in words.  Martinez strives to make statements that are positive and uplifting and draws from her background in architecture to explore the interaction between humans and nature and the qualities that shape our faith and values today.

At MAD, Martinez will use computer parts to create sculptures and jewelry that respond to the inherent beauty in abandoned materials by giving them “second lives.”  She uses assemblage techniques, along with mold making and casting methods.  Martinez is also interested in visitor response, namely, visitors’ reactions to her work and how their insights and thoughts can inform her process.

Martinez studied architecture at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras and received a certificate in fine arts and a diploma from the National Academy School of Fine Arts, NY.  Martinez exhibits in New York and internationally. For more information please visit her website: www.nadiamartinez.com.


Anjuli Rathod

Bos-2015-picks-anjuli-rathod"Anjuli Rathod’s paintings are so delightfully cryptic. They’re often made up of disparate elements — most notably fruits and vegetables, nooses and knives, and body parts — but brought together in a way that’s figurative without being literal. Standing before one, you feel like you’re looking at fragments of a story — the clues in a murder mystery, perhaps — but without the ability to piece the tale together. Rathod contrasts her sinister themes with strong colors and a brushy, almost cartoonish painting style, turning potential horror into something much funnier and more twisted." —Jillian Steinhauer