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Drawings

Jason Bard Yarmosky

Yarmosky_sound_smJason Bard Yarmosky  is a painter whose work draws the viewer into an unusual and slightly disconcerting space. In his recent Elder Kinder series he pays homage to the idea that age is not a deterrent to living fully, but rather a springboard for exploration.

"My paintings examine the relationship between the limitations of social norms and the freedom to explore, particularly the juxtaposition between the young and old. The carefree nature that is associated with youth often gives way to borders and boundaries placed on adult behavior. As we transition from adult to elderly, these raw freedoms often reemerge. As a child you learn to walk; later in life we learn to unwalk, literally and metaphorically. However, the dreams of the young, often sublimated by the years, never really disappear.

I choose to explore this theme with two people very close to me, my eighty-four year old grandparents. The process of aging has always intrigued me. The lack of permanence in life and the inevitability of aging has always been on my mind growing up. I am also interested in how people, in both mind and body, respond to the passage of time. As Madeleine L'Engle 
said, “The great thing about getting older is that you don't lose all the other ages you've been.”

The resulting paintings capture the intersection of the battered body and the vibrant soul. The images in this series can be seen as either humiliating or empowering. The pessimist sees the images through the lens of shame and vulnerability, weighed down by social convention. The optimist sees a sense of liberation, where an adolescent's playfulness and the freedom to dream complement the wisdom of old age."


Richard Denny

Richard DennyRichard Denny is an artist who experiments with a range of materials His "portraiture" work called The Visitors takes a journey. The Visitors arrive from all directions – along pathways, alleyways and major arteries, through mountain passes, across seas, arid deserts, fertile pastures, the sky, through doors and sometimes the mind.  Employing a layered mixed media approach, he has combined enamel, acrylics and irregularly shaped pieces of painted cut canvas with detailed regional maps from around world. These dynamic works are stapled and fixed onto paper, wood and old doors.

Denny is a Melbourne-based artist whose dynamic work contains mixed media including detailed vintage maps from around the world, gleaned and collected on his numerous travels and habitations. Since his departure from photography as his primary chosen medium in 2008, his work has been exhibited in London, Barcelona, Sydney, The Gold Coast and Melbourne.


Jessica Ward

Jessica WardDrawing upon her dark past, Jessica Ward illustrates an unflinching look into the neurosis of young women in the face of society's ideals. Working almost exclusively with graphite, her statuesque heroines are riddled with disorders that decay at their allure, rendering them both beautiful yet repugnant.


Jon McNair

MacNair_long_horned_demonAn accomplished editorial illustrator, Jon McNair has clients who include  include those at numerous magazines and publications such as Computer Arts, Elle Girl, and Hyphen Magazine.

 

Working almost exclusively in black and white, McNair designs creatures and their environments rooted in myth and mysticism. In his new body of work, he continues to explore his cast of seemingly malevolent characters that are are often just misunderstood.

 

McNair also hosts an art blog called Scritchy Scraps


Claudio Parentela

Claudio_parentela_painting_381Claudio Parentela is a mixed media artist whose work crosses from cartoon to low brow art.

Born in Catanzaro, Italy where he lives and works, Claudio Parentela is an illustrator, painter, photographer, mail artist, cartoonist, collagist, journalist free lance. Active since many years in the international underground scene, he has collaborated with many zines, magazines of contemporary art, literary publications and comics in Italy and in the world


Michael Borremans

Michael borremans Michael Borremans’ drawings, paintings, and films present an evocative combination of solemn-looking characters, unusual close-ups, and unsettling still lifes. There is a theatrical dimension to his works, which are at once highly staged and ambiguous, just as his complex and open-ended scenes lend themselves to conflicting moods—at once nostalgic, darkly comical, disturbing, and grotesque. His paintings display a concentrated dialogue with previous art historical epochs, yet their unconventional compositions and curious narratives defy expectations and lend them an indefinable yet universal character.

Lone figures in pensive or semiconscious states are depicted squarely in the center of the compositions; while their faces are mostly obscured, a psychologically-charged mood prevails. Some are positioned within barren spaces reminiscent of an artist’s studio with planks or canvases arranged against walls, while others are portrayed luminously against dark, monochrome backgrounds. Titles provide simple but uncertain descriptions, which offer little help for unlocking the narratives.

Over the past decade, Borremans’ work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at a number of prominent institutions, most recently in 2011 with the comprehensive solo show Eating the Beard, which was first on view at Württembergischer Kunstverein Stuttgart and traveled to Műcsarnok Kunsthalle, Budapest, and Kunsthalle Helsinki. In 2010, he had a solo exhibition at the Kunstnernes Hus in Oslo as well as commissioned work on view at the Royal Palace in Brussels. Other solo exhibitions include kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2009); de Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam (2007); La maison rouge, Paris (2006); Kunsthalle Bremerhaven, Germany; and the Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Basel (both 2004). In 2005, he had a one-person exhibition of paintings and drawings at the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (S.M.A.K.), Ghent. The paintings then traveled to Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London, and The Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin, while the drawings traveled to the Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio. Work by the artist is held in numerous public collections internationally, including The Art Institute of Chicago; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (S.M.A.K.), Ghent; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He lives and works in Ghent. 


Art Spiegelman

Art SpiegelmanArthur Spiegelman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, and immigrated to the United States with his parents in his early childhood. Spiegelman studied cartooning in high school and started drawing professionally at age sixteen. Despite his parents wanting him to become a dentist, Art Spiegelman majored in art and philosophy at Harpur College. After leaving college in 1968, he joined the underground comix movement.

The following decade, Spiegelman became a regular contributor to various underground publications, including Real Pulp, Young Lust and Bizarre Sex. Under a variety of pseudonyms like Joe Cutrate, Skeeter Grant and Al Flooglebuckle he drew creations such as 'Ace Hole, Midget Detective', 'Nervous Rex', 'Douglas Comics' and 'Cracking Jokes'. In 1975, he and Bill Griffith co-founded Arcade, an influential comix revue with artists like Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson and Justin Green.

Perhaps his best known tour de force was Maus . 'Maus' was based on the experiences of his parents as concentration-camp survivors. He expanded this premise into a full-blown graphic novel, which he drew from 1980 to 1986, with the Jews presented as mice and the Germans as cats (the Katzies). The book 'Maus: A Survivor's Tale', earned Spiegelman fame. He completed the tale in 1991 with 'Maus II: From Mauschwitz to the Catskills'. Art Spiegelman received the Pullitzer Prize in 1992.

 


Maira Kalman

Crosstown-Boogie-Woogie Maira Kalman Working as an illustrator, author, and designer, Maira Kalman illuminates contemporary life with a profound sense of joy and a unique sense of humor. 

Kalman speaks of her work as a form of journalism. She uses writing and drawing to render an ongoing account of the world as she sees it. Hers is a daily discipline of creativity based on photography, travel, research, walking, talking, and open observation. A serious love of distraction pervades. Abundant depictions of fashion, food, art, and architecture represent life’s great pleasures. At the same time rubber bands, pieces of moss, bobby pins, and snacks stake a claim for smaller forms of satisfaction. All of this might seem pretty trivial were it not for the counterweight of history, memory, and loss that is also ever-present. Chaos is another constant, be it crazy and madcap or simply devastating.

Indeed, it is her work’s gift to illuminate those things that affirm our own capacity for joy, sadness, humor, charm. In short, Kalman’s art inspires our humanity in light of life’s overwhelming events and details.

Maira Kalman (b. 1949 Tel Aviv, lives New York) is the author of twelve children’s books including Ooh-la-la (Max in Love). Among her adult classics are The Elements of Style, an illustrated edition of Strunk and White’s timeless grammar, and The Principles of Uncertainty, a picture book of essays based on a yearlong online column for The New York Times. She has just completed a second online epic for The Times titled And the Pursuit of Happiness.

Kalman’s best known work, created with fellow illustrator Rick Meyerowitz, is New Yorkistan: a cartoon map of the city designated by tribes, such as Pashmina, Irant, and Irate. When it ran on the cover of The New Yorker in December 2001, it sanctioned a first burst of laughter in the aftermath of 9/11. A relatively more secret aspect of her identity is as the “M” in M&Co, the revolutionary design firm founded by her late husband, Tibor Kalman, with whom she was a constant collaborator. The firm’s famous 10-One-4 watch is based on one of her doodles. She has collaborated on projects with the fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi, the choreographer Mark Morris, and the composer Nico Muhly. Her work can be seen in The Jewish Museum .


Eric Rosner

Eric rosner Illustrating in NYC for over 20 years, Eric Rosner has a unique style that recaptures a classic period of Manhattan and presents it for a new participating audience. Ink marker is used to create stunning iconic structures from a golden era. This process is combined with digital enhancements that complete a singular vision to showcase New York City's most eloquent inhabitants.

His canvas prints grab the attention of the on-looker as an awe inspiring tribute to to golden age with a modern twist for today. "I get lost in the the moment when a piece comes to life. You find yourself thinking of all the people who have grace the grand Metropolis and these buildings have housed them all. Whether it was epic business transaction, stunning scientific discoveries or grand entertainment showcasing, the city of New York has a unique tale of histories. With my artwork, I hope you can imaging a stunning time period over a century ago when the imagination ran wild and magnificent structures soared to the sky."


Salvador Dali

Salvador dali Who hasn't been fascinated by the art of Salvador Dali. Dali was an enigmatic figure who figured prominantly in the Surrealist movement of the 1930s. But his very quirky personality soon transferred him into less of a fine artist in the original sense and more of a performance artist - one who transcended painting to become a filmmaker, jewelry designer, author and costumer.

Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dali i Domenech, was born on May 11, 1904, in Figueres, Spain. He attended the San Fernando Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid and led to his  first one-man show, held in Barcelona in 1925. He recieved international fame when three of his paintings were shown in the third annual Carnegie International Exhibition in Pittsburgh in 1928.

After this, Dali went to Paris, and joined the Paris Surrealist Group. It was in this same year that Dali met Gala Eluard when she visited him in Cadaques with her husband, the French poet Paul Eluard. She became Dali's lover, muse, business manager, and the source of inspiration for many of Dali's greatest works. They were married in 1934 at a civil ceremony and made their first trip to America. Dali emerged as a leader of the Surrealist movement and his painting, Persistence of Memory (1931) is still one of the best known surrealist works.

But, as war approached, the apolitical Dali clashed with the Surrealists and he was expelled during a trial conducted by the group in 1934. Although he did exhibit works in international surrealist exhibitions throughout the decade, asserting that: "le Surrealisme c'est moi" by 1940 he was ready to move into a new era, one that he termed "classic."

During World War II Dali and his wife, Gala, took refuge in the United States, returning after the war's end to Spain. His international reputation continued to grow, based as much on his flamboyance and flair for publicity as on his prodigious output of paintings, graphic works, and book illustrations; and designs for jewellrey, textiles, clothing, costumes, shop interiors, and stage sets. His writings include poetry, fiction, and a controversial autobiography, `The Secret Life of Salvador Dali'. He also produced two films - `An Andalusian Dog'(1928) and `The Golden Age'(1930) - in collaboration with Bunuel.