Pawpourri

Ben & Jerry's For Dogs

Dog breedsBen & Jerry’s unveiled plans to introduce a line of frozen dog treats. The first up to bowl is Doggie Desserts, four cups of ice cream that come in two flavors: pumpkin with cookies and peanut butter with pretzels.

This from the company's website -

Here at Ben & Jerry's, we love our dogs almost as much as we love our ice cream (okay, maybe the same amount). That's why we are proud to have dog-friendly offices, where we welcome our "K9-5ers" to join their humans at work each day. Members of the K9 crew start their day with a pup-friendly treat at the reception desk, and enjoy plenty of pets, cuddles, and walks throughout the day. It's a "ruff" life for this pack of K9 pals, to be sure. But as any Ben & Jerry's-er will tell you, having their furry friend by their side during the day makes all this hard ice cream work all the sweeter.

Doggie Desserts

Ben & Jerry's Doggie Desserts are the perfect frozen dog treat for your beloved pup! Just like you love Ben & Jerry's ice cream, your dog will love Doggie Desserts.

 
 

Puppy Sleep Habits

Dog resting on chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casper Mattress company believes that puppies have distinct sleeping habits

There are specific daytime and nighttime sleep habits unique to puppies.

> Daytime sleeping habits: Puppies tend to sleep a lot more than dogs during the day. This excessive sleeping helps them mature, grow, and process the variety of information they have learned. You may also notice your pup napping several times during the day. Some puppies may even sleep every hour. These power naps are normal and may even come out of the blue! Puppies can fall asleep in the oddest places and may even fall asleep in the middle of a training or play session.

> Nighttime sleeping habits: When you first bring your pup home, you may notice that they’re very restless at night. They may get up to go to the bathroom, get water, or eat several times. After a few months, this should stop and you will notice your pup getting around 10 full hours of sleep.

Just like human babies, puppies need an adequate amount of sleep so they can develop and grow properly. To make sure your pup is getting enough sleep, it’s important for them to stick to a consistent sleep schedule.

How Long Do Dogs Sleep?

Typically, adult dogs will sleep 12–14 hours a day. However, just like humans, these numbers can vary based on your dog, their age, activity level, and personality. Dr. Linda Simon says that you “will likely find that your pooch sleeps more on days they have been most active.”
 
According to Veterinarian Dr. Joanna Woodnutt from DoggieDesigner, “dogs sleep the most between 9:00 PM and 6:00 AM, although usually have afternoon naps.” These naps can happen several times a day depending on your dog.
 
Puppies, on the other hand, need significantly more sleep and can even sleep to up to 20 hours a day. If you notice that your dog starts to sleep a lot more or is staying awake longer than usual, consider scheduling a vet exam to check for any underlying issues.

How to Help Your Pup Get the Best Sleep

It’s important to always keep an eye on your dog’s sleeping habits. The position they sleep in or the amount of sleep they get each day can be little clues into how they are feeling — both mentally and physically.
 
Dr. Jennifer Coates says that “dogs who are sleeping more or less than normal or in new positions or locations may be suffering from an illness or injury.” It’s always a good idea to talk to your veterinarian if you have any concerns about your dog’s sleep habits.
 
To help your dog get the best sleep possible, make sure their sleeping environment is comfortable. You can do this by buying a dog bed they love, filling their sleep area with their favorite toys, and keeping water nearby. Casper Dog Bed is made with pressure-relieving memory foam and supportive foam bolsters so your dog can sleep safe, supported, and comforted all night long. If your dog is a cuddler and likes to snooze in bed beside you, make sure to get a mattress protector to safe-guard against any accidents or spills.

 


Fostering Stray Cats Gave Me Purpose

From the New York Times - an excerpt  on the movement to rescue feral cats. Inspiring!

Cat family portrait‘I Literally Had No One.’ Then the Foster Kittens Arrived.

Last summer, Jali Henry was feeling lonely and depressed after many of her friends moved out of the city because of the pandemic. “I literally had no one,” she said. “I was like, ‘What the hell am I doing here?’” Then she began noticing street cats in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where she lives: first, a group of four that lived behind a school; then, a cat on her block, obviously sick and infested with fleas. Ms. Henry, 28, who had started volunteering with the rescue group Puppy Kitty NYC, corralled the cat and took it to the vet. “I kind of chased her around the neighborhood, it was really crazy,” she said. “Random people stopped to help me.”

 

Longtime animal-rescue volunteers in the city suspect there are more stray and feral cats on the streets these days, but there are also, it turns out, more New Yorkers like Ms. Henry, who want to rescue and foster them. “On one hand, we have a group of people who are subject to financial and housing insecurity, which makes them more likely to have to part ways with their pet in a very tragic way, which leads to more cats on the street,” said Will Zweigart, the founder of the Brooklyn-based nonprofit Flatbush Cats. “An entirely different group is experiencing this pandemic with more free time. They’ve finished their Netflix queue, they’re aching for a sense of purpose.”

Betty Arce, a retired Education Department administrator who has been rescuing cats for eight years in the Bronx, said that she had never seen as many cats on the streets before, especially friendly cats and, starting last spring, kittens. “We suspect there is an increase, we just don’t know by how much,” said Kathleen O’Malley, who leads the Bideawee Feral Cat Initiative, which focuses on spaying and neutering community cats.

Neighborhood Cats, a group based in Manhattan, said its number of online donations doubled last April and May, and continue to come in at much higher rates than before the pandemic. Bryan Kortis, the national programs director, said he had also noticed an increase in the number of New Yorkers seeking training on how to help community cats. “They’re home more; they’re more aware of what’s going on in the backyard,” he said.

That’s what happened to Carmen Castillo-Barrett, a science teacher who lives in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Last June, she and her husband realized that three newborn kittens were living in their backyard. After she had the kittens and their mother fixed, Ms. Castillo-Barrett, 42, went through what she called an “interesting summer socializing feral cats.” She would sit beside the kittens as they ate, hissing at her, she said, until eventually they would let her touch them with just one finger. It provided a welcome distraction. “It was like a big experiment,” she said. If it hadn’t been for the pandemic, “it’s possible this could have happened and we wouldn’t have noticed.”

 

Cat volunteers still face major challenges. There is no city or state funding for organizations that trap, neuter and return cats to the streets. That method, which Bideawee practices, is endorsed by the A.S.P.C.A. and the Humane Society. The Audubon Society and other bird and wildlife advocacy organizations, however, oppose the practice because they consider outdoor cats a predatory threat to songbirds. And getting appointments for free or low-cost spaying and neutering, which has always been difficult, is even more so now.

Still, the rising interest in helping street cats during the pandemic offers a glimmer of hope for people like Mr. Zweigart, who, when not rescuing cats, researches the future of work as a brand strategist. “I’m very optimistic that past 2021 we’re only going to see a higher interest in fostering as people have higher flexibility and only spend more time at home,” he said.

Hayong Lau, 28, who lost her job at a cocktail bar last spring, began fostering kittens, even bottle-feeding a newborn every two hours at one point. “Fostering feels like we have something to control, and it just felt good to do something good,” she said. Ms. Henry, who also plans to continue fostering, has started documenting her experiences on Instagram, in the hopes of getting her charges adopted. “I want to eventually take in smaller kittens and expand my expertise,” she said.

 


Pets of the Art World

From Artnet -

Pets of the Art World! Meet 15 of the Adorable (Yet Edgy) Furry Friends Keeping Artists, Gallerists, and Curators Sane These Days

Perhaps the only beneficiaries of the pandemic today are pets, who are suddenly getting around-the-clock attention while their owners work from home. And the joys are mutual: With their fluffy cuddles, unconditional love, and inability to talk back, pets make great quarantine companions for people, too.

We asked art world insiders to share pictures of their whiskered work-from-home buddies, and how they’re helping to make this difficult time a little bit sweeter.

Here is one and there is a link to see the rest at the bottom of this post.

Princess Buttercup
(Caroline Goldstein’s Jug [Jack Russell x Pug])

HRH Princess Buttercup in bed. (Courtesy of Caroline Goldstein)

“Princess Buttercup is thrilled to have a captive audience whilst her humans are social distancing.”

Caroline Goldstein, editorial assistant, Artnet News

 

Check out this link to see all of the pets.


Dog Sleeping Patterns and Behaviors

According to Casper Mattress Company, dogs have distinct sleeping patterns and behaviors. Maybe a Dog Bed can make the difference?

Here is how they list out:

Dog-sleeping-patterns

  • Dreaming: Yes, dogs can dream too! While it’s difficult to uncover exactly what dogs dream about, we know the brain processes their events of the day during sleep. So we can assume they’re dreaming of what happened during the day — like a walk around the block or chasing a squirrel.
  • Twitching: Just like humans, dogs may twitch in their sleep while they are dreaming or moving between sleep stages. This is a completely normal part of the sleep cycle.
  • Barking or squeaking: If your dog barks (or squeaks) during sleep, don’t panic. This is completely normal and may indicate that they’re reacting to something that’s happening in their dream.
  • Running: You may notice this when your dog is sleeping on their side and their paws start to move in unison. This is typically in response to a dream your dog may be having.
  • Snoring: Some dogs snore just as much as humans, however not every dog will snore. Snoring is most common in dogs with breathing issues and short noses — such as pugs, bulldogs, and boxers.
  • Circling and digging: Sometimes dogs will circle or dig before lying down to sleep. According to Peter Laskay, this behavior comes from the dog’s ancestors — wolves. Peter says that wolves did this to get “rid of excess leaves, earth, and snow by digging to make their sleep area more comfortable.”

If you notice your dog exhibiting any of the above sleep patterns, there is no need to worry! Every dog’s sleeping habits will be different and are perfectly normal.


10 Dog Sleeping Positions and What They Mean

Casper mattresses has produced a fun and informative guide on dog sleeping positions and what they mean. Just like humans, dogs sleep in a variety of positions. From sleeping on their side to sleeping on their back with their paws in the air, we can learn a lot about our furry friends through their sleeping positions and habits. And here is an insight into dog beds.
 
Dog sleeping positions are like little clues that can give insight into how they are — both physically and mentally. To truly understand the meaning behind common dog sleeping positions, we tapped the minds of dog experts to reveal what 10 common dog sleeping positions mean. Read on to learn more about the adorable meaning behind these sleeping positions.

What-type-of-sleeper-is-your-dog

1. The Side Sleeper

Just like humans, dogs love to sleep on their side. Lying on their side with their legs extended is one of the most common sleeping positions for dogs. This sleeping position is especially prominent in puppies and older dogs who may be suffering from stiff joints.
 
Meaning: When your dog sleeps on their side, it means they feel relaxed and safe in their environment. According to Dr. Jennifer Coates, DVM, who serves on the advisory board for Pup Life Today, “dogs will sleep in this position when they are feeling comfortable with their surroundings and are at a comfortable temperature.”
 
It’s also when they’re likely to get the most deep sleep. Jen Jones, a professional dog trainer, behavior specialist, and founder of Your Dog Advisor, says that “this position is also where you’ll often notice ‘sleep running’ and twitching during your dog’s dreams, as their paws are loose and free to move.”

2. The Lion’s Pose

The lion’s pose sleeping position (also called ‘the sphinx’) is when your dog sleeps with their head on top of their paws — similar to statues of lions you might see outside of large buildings. Your dog can also fall asleep in this position with their front paws tucked in and their back legs at one side.
 
Meaning: When dogs sleep in this position it means they are resting, but not sleeping deeply. According to Dr. Sarah Wooten, DVM, CVJ, and the vet expert at Pumpkin Pet Insurance, “dogs will often start out in this position if they feel like they will need to jump up quickly.”

3. The Superman

The superman position is when your dog lays sprawled out on the ground with their belly pressed to the floor, their back legs behind them, and their front legs stretched forward. This is a common position among puppies and very playful dogs.
 
Meaning: When your dog sleeps on their stomach in the superman position, it means that they’re tired but ready to play if the opportunity arises. Jen Jones says that “this position allows for dogs to snooze quickly, but be ready to hop up at a moment’s notice to play.” This is a common sleeping position for high energy dogs during the day.

4. The Donut

The donut position is when your dog sleeps curled up in a ball with all of their limbs tucked close to their body. Sometimes their nose will touch their hind legs and they may even drape their tail over their body.
 
Meaning: This position keeps all of the dog’s vital organs tucked and hidden. When a dog sleeps in this position, it means that they seek to protect themselves while sleeping or that they’re still getting used to their environment. This is especially common in stray or new dogs.
 
This is also a favorite position for dogs when they are cold. By curling up in a ball, they are attempting to preserve their body heat. Dr. Linda Simon, a Veterinarian and Veterinary Consultant for ThePets, says that this is a popular position “when the weather is cold and/or windy, as it would have protected dogs from the elements when they slept outside.”

5. The Cuddler

One of the most adorable dog sleeping positions is ‘the cuddler’ position. This is when your dog prefers to sleep on top of you or another dog cuddled up. This is a great position for those that love to let their dog sleep in bed with them.
 
Meaning: Peter Laskay, a pet expert and pet care blogger at Petworshiper, says that this position is a clear sign of bonding and “that the dog wants to get close to you or other dogs.”

6. The Burrower

Have you noticed that your dog seeks out pillows, clothes, or blankets to sleep under? If so, your pooch likes to sleep in the burrower position.
 
Meaning: When dogs sleep in the burrower position, they are searching for comfort and security. They often need lots of attention and affection to fall asleep.

7. The Belly Up

Arguably one of the cutest dog sleeping positions, the belly up position is just as it sounds. This position is when your dog lies on their back with their belly up and paws in the air. As uncomfortable as this position may look, this is a sign of true comfort and relaxation in dogs.
 
Meaning: Dogs who sleep on their back with their tummy and paws in the air do so for a few reasons. One of them is to keep cool. Jen Jones says, “dogs sweat through their paws and their belly is a source of heat. When they sleep on their back with their belly in the air and paws up, they are trying to keep cool.”
 
Because this is such a vulnerable position to be in, when dogs sleep on their back with their paws in the air, it also means that they are fully trusting you and their environment. Dr. Sarah Wooten says that “because they are exposing their belly and their vital organs to the world, you have to know that they feel really secure to fall asleep in this position.”
 
As dogs age, you’ll notice that they no longer sleep on their back as much. According to Steffi Trott, a professional dog trainer and the owner of SpiritDog Training, this is due to arthritis and you should not assume that your dog is no longer trusting you.

8. Back to Back

Similar to the cuddler sleeping position, when a dog likes to sleep back to back, it means they like to cuddle up and get as close as possible by placing their back next to either you or another dog. In the simplest form, this position is a sign of love and comfort.
 
Meaning: Sleeping back to back indicates a sense of intimacy. When a dog sleeps in this position, they are showing you affection and trust. According to Jen Jones, “dogs may choose to sleep this way with one person in the home they feel safest with.” This can include additional family members or other dogs and cats.

9. On a Cold Surface

Whether it’s lying face down on the kitchen floor or sprawled out on your pavement, dogs tend to sleep on a cold surface when they are hot. This type of position can take the form of the superman pose or could be similar to the lion’s pose. Whatever it is, your dog is likely making sure their tummy is touching the cold surface.
 
Meaning: This position is directly related to temperature. “Dogs may be hot if they sleep sprawled out on cool surfaces, particularly when they’re on their bellies with legs extended maximizing the amount of unhaired skin that touches the cold floor or ground,” says Dr. Jennifer Coates. If you notice your dog seeking out cold surfaces to sleep on, try your best to cool them down and give them some water.

10. Head and Neck Raised

Some dogs seek out a sleeping position where their head and neck are raised. They will usually leverage the side of their dog bed or a couch cushion.
 
Meaning: If your dog likes to sleep in a position where their head and neck are raised, it could mean that they may have issues breathing properly — something commonly seen with chronic heart disease and other health problems.
 
According to Dr. Linda Simon, if your dog sleeps in this position “keep an eye out for worrying symptoms such as faster breathing rate, noisy breathing, or a reduced ability to exercise.” If you notice any of these symptoms, make sure to contact your veterinarian.

 


Advancements in Dog Orthotics Over the Year

Dog orthoticsHelene Petersen of KVP Orthotics writes to us to describe the available methods of improving the quality and mobility of our beloved dogs.
 
Over the years, there have been plenty of breakthroughs in the field of dog orthotics. As pet owners, this is certainly to our benefit. If before, there weren’t very many options for us to help
improve our dogs’ quality of life, now, there is hope.
 
Here are some of the recent advancements in dog orthotics.

Orthopedic Braces
One of the biggest advancements in dog orthotics today is orthopedic braces. Before, most injuries and orthopedic problems only have surgery as the solution. Nowadays, orthopedic braces can be used both as an alternative or adjunct to surgery. Our dogs no longer have to suffer from the pain and discomfort if they are not able to get surgery.

Back Brace
There is a wide range of orthopedic braces available for our dogs. One of the most common is a back brace. This is often given to dogs who have problems with their vertebral column or spine. Whether it’s for an injury or for correction of wrong posture, back braces are an excellent solution.

Knee Brace
Knees are perhaps the most commonly injured part of a dog’s limbs. This is specially for susceptible dog breeds like German Shepherd, Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers, and many more. You may ask your veterinarian if your dog is susceptible to this issue. A knee brace is often indicated for problems like anterior cruciate ligament or ACL tears as well as other ligament or tendon injuries in the knee.

Hock Brace
Hock braces are certainly unique to dogs. They are used to support our dog’s back legs. Oftentimes, dogs injure or strain their hock joint from trauma, overuse, and other factors. A hock brace can help them become more comfortable by reducing the swelling and inflammation in the area. Because of this, they are also great for old dogs suffering from arthritis.

Elbow Brace
Although less commonly injured, our dogs’ elbows are certainly not immune to problems. Elbow dysplasia is a disease of large dog breeds. They can be a very painful condition for the dog if not addressed properly. With an elbow brace, we can help improve their mobility and lessen the pain.

Fortunately, dog orthotics is a continuously evolving field. Through this, we can always rely to find the perfect solutions for our dog’s orthopedic problems. We can expect more innovations to come in the field. Thus, we can also expect more options and ways for us to improve our dogs’ lives."