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ENO Breathe Shows How Singing Opera Can Help Long Haul Covid Patients

More than a year later, Sheeba, a long haul Covid survivor, still faces bouts of breathlessness, fatigue and anxiety, things she rarely experienced prior to her Covid-19 diagnosis. And she’s not alone.

Most Covid-19 patients recover and return to normal health two to six weeks after initial diagnosis, according to the World Health Organization. But the global medical community is finding that lingering symptoms are quite common, and some conditions can last weeks or even months after a negative Covid-19 test. Symptoms can include fatigue and anxiety, similar to what Sheeba is experiencing, as well as shortness of breath, muscle pain, headaches, rashes and persistent coughs.

Frustrated that she wasn’t getting better, Sheeba turned to the internet for answers and stumbled upon ENO Breathe. Launched in June, ENO Breathe began as a pilot program in partnership with the English National Opera (ENO) and the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, part of one of the largest healthcare networks in the United Kingdom. Working together, a team of doctors, therapists and vocal coaches developed a breathing and well-being program for people like Sheeba who were recovering from Covid-19 but still suffering from breathlessness and anxiety. Their idea was simple: Take the same vocal techniques and breathing exercises used by opera singers and apply them to Covid-19 patients in a group setting. The program is structured into hour-long sessions that take place via Zoom once a week over the course of six weeks. (It’s also entirely free.)

 

Read the full article here.


Love These Hats!

Hat donut-1000x563According to Israel21c, Maor Zabar makes some crazy hats. They are definitely artworks unto themselves.

Growing up in Haifa, Maor Zabar was the kind of kid who painted on the furniture and drew on the walls.

“I used to drive my parents nuts,” admits the 42-year-old award-winning costume and hat designer.

Fortunately, his parents indulged their little boy’s artistic exploits. They sent him to afterschool art lessons and the WIZO Haifa Academy of Design for high school. He spent a year living with an uncle in New York, learning makeup artistry before finding his true calling.

Zabar’s famed creations include the attention-grabbing getup that Netta Barzilai wore for her winning performance in the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. In 2014, Zabar started his hat business.

He doesn’t consider himself a milliner. He simply loves hats and wanted to create them freely outside the confines of his theatrical costume commissions.

“I don’t treat my hats as fashion items. I refer to them as art pieces,” he says.

It wasn’t long before images of his hats – featuring food, carnivorous plants, sea creatures, pride, and bride themes – from his online Etsy store began making a buzz in the blogosphere. “I get inspired by things I come across, even pictures in a book or a vacation I took,” explains Zabar.

You can spot Zabar’s hats on stylish heads at launch events, red-carpet events and British horseraces.

“If you’re daring enough and want to make a fashion statement, a hat is the most standout item to do that with,” says Zabar.


The Plastic Bag Store

As of March 1 in NY, plastic bags are banned in all stores. Part art installation and part political commentary, TImes Square is hosting the Plastic Bag Store running from March 18-April 12, 2020 at 20 Times Square at 47th and 7th Avenue. There are even performances twice a day. Open Tuesday through Sunday from 11a to 6p.

Times Square Arts is proud to present The Plastic Bag Store, a public art installation and immersive theater piece by artist and director Robin Frohardt employing humor, craft, and a critical lens to our culture of consumption and convenience — specifically, the enduring effects of our single-use plastics.

Free and open to the public, The Plastic Bag Store will occupy 20 Times Square, where shelves will be stocked with thousands of original, hand-sculpted items — produce and meat, dry goods and toiletries, cakes and sushi rolls —  all made from discarded, single-use plastics in an endless flux of packaging. At night, the store transforms into an immersive, dynamic set for free performances where hidden worlds and inventive puppetry tell the darkly comedic, sometimes tender story of how the overabundance of plastic waste we leave behind might be misinterpreted by future generations.


Take A Virtual Walk Through the Graffiti-Fileld 191st Subway Tunnel

Definitely worth a visit for any graffiti fans. Matt Coneybeare writes that The 191st Street Station in Washington Heights is home to one of the most colorful, graffiti and street-art filled tunnels in New York City. Used as a passageway to get from Broadway and 190th to the station, the tunnel extends over 1000 feet under the hills of Washington Heights. Take a walk through the tunnel in this immersive video from local YouTuber ActionKid, though we disagree with his labeling of the tunnel as creepy.

A walkthrough of the 191st Street Station in Washington Heights, Manhattan on the (1) Train. It features a very creepy subway passageway, dirty tracks and platforms, and an elevator. It is also the deepest subway station in the system.


Pixel Art - Combining Mosaics with Street Art

Pixel is an artist from Santiago, Chile, who started his design career when it was still hard to think that visual design will evolve towards technologies, as it prevails today.  Today, the use of technology is not only an obligation, but a responsibility, as it allows us to record our history and improve our design and artistic tools.

In Paris, he learned firsthand of the work of Space Invader who inspired him to research pixel and mosaic techniques. Subsequently, he studied the religious and decorative mosaics of Mesopotamia, Greece and Byzantium. He began to explore the use of the pixel to create simplified images that synthesized color and form to its limit. Now, he has reached a cohesion between photography, mosaic, and dominant technological tools to create his own signature technique.

At first, people think they are facing a painting. Approaching and touching, they realize they are in fact facing a mosaic. Then, they wonder if it was really hand made.  They also play with distance to appreciate the work in detail, take photos, and when the image is revealed perfect and detailed on the small screens of their smartphones, they fall for it!


Need A Studio Workspace? Try Con Artist Collective in Lower Manhattan

Con Artist Collective is a communal artist workspace located in downtown Manhattan.It seems very affordable -

The Con Artist Collective opened in 2010, and membership to the collective is only $5 a month. Create your account anytime at conartistcollective.com All members of the collective can add access to the shared artist workspace at 119 Ludlow st. at anytime.

Access to our creative coworking space includes:
photo studio + lighting
drop sink with power washer
wood shop
power tools
computers (incl. CC,iD,Premier etc)
4 color silk screen press
screen exposure unit
free wifi (T3 Line)
multiple work tables/private nooks
easels
lockable personal storage units
artwork storage
exhibition space
mobile meeting/private booth
community supplies
plus our biggest asset- 245+ artist network
regular gallery shows
regular members only events

LIMITED ACCESS PLANS: (no contracts, no commitments)
$14 an hour, $39 a day, $99 a week.

MONTHLY ACCESS PLANS:
$129 1 day a week, $179 daily 11am to 6pm, $229 unlimited access 24/7/365.

So many different ways to get involved! Schedule a Tour Or come to a gallery night, every Wednesday 8pm to 11pm

Check out their video to see if it is a place where you get creative.

 


REALLY Immerse Yourself in Art with Virtual Reality

Thanks to a new virtual reality project launched this week by the Google Cultural Institute, you can now immerse yourself in one of Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s most bizarre paintings and hang out with the peculiar creatures that cover its canvas. The project, which brings to life the Flemish master’s 1562 “The Fall of the Rebel Angels,” is viewable on YouTube but is best experienced on headsets such as a Google Cardboard mask. While the Institute has recently brought 360-degree videos of performances closer to audiences around the world, this marks the first time it has created a virtual reality experience for an artwork.

While the performance videos were a little underwhelming, this new video is actually pretty neat. It transports you directly to the artwork’s current home — the Royal Museums of Fine Arts Belgium, which worked in partnership with the Google Cultural Institute — where it pulls you into the image. As a narrator explains the scene, which shows the moment a gold armor-adorned St. Michael expels the devil from paradise, you’re surrounded by the flapping wings of angels transformed into demons, of butterflies, and of hybrid monsters, some possibly inspired by Hieronymus Bosch, as your guide mentions. Above you, a swarm of beasts appears to spiral from the white heavens; below lies a murky darkness just visible past the crowd of waving limbs, claws, and tails.

 

The experience is part of Bruegel: Unseen Masterpieces, a collaborative project between Google Cultural Institute and eight major international museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, London’s Royal Collection Trust, and Copenhagen’s Statens Museum for Kunst. Over 200 of Bruegel’s paintings, drawn from the collections of these institutions, were digitized and published online, allowing anyone with an internet connection to explore them through extremely high resolution images accompanied by detailed annotations.

The art-meets-tech experience also has a physical component at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts Belgium, where visitors may engage with the Bruegels on view through more virtual reality and screen-based projects. The museum’s officials launched the collaboration with Google in anticipation of the 450th anniversary of the painter’s death, which will be in 2019.

This was reported on HyperAllergic.


The Best in Australian Street Art

Lost in E Minor reports of a very special place in Melbourne, Australia for street art:

If you’re looking to set your eyes on some serious street art – street art where some of the world’s best artists come to play – you don’t have to travel to New York or Buenos Aires. Some of the very best street art is in the heart of Melbourne’s CBD. Welcome to Hosier Lane, a cobbled stone laneway just off Flinders Street, where art overtakes everything.

This is much more than a place to tag. Hosier Lane is actually a well-recognised landmark of the city, and in The Age writer Chris Johnston’s words, is a ‘postmodern confluence of art forms’. That’s big fancy words for serious art.

Expect to spend a few hours wandering up and down the laneway on any given visit. You’ll find the work of iconic artists Sophia Argiriou, Adnate, Ha-Ha, Psalm, and Vexta, all competing for your attention with their extravagant murals and colourful sculpture work lining the alleyway.

But here’s the best part: the art is continuously changing at Hosier Lane. There’s a beautiful life cycle that comes with street art – one artist will create a masterpiece, and after it has been admired and critiqued, another piece will appear in its place. So you can visit Hosier Lane one week, come back another week, and you’ll have an entirely different experience.

And if you’re really lucky, you’ll see some of Australia’s best street artists creating those vibrant masterpieces right before your eyes.

 

ourne

Play Melbourne Contributor
 

SPONSORED LOVE

by Play Melbourne in Cool Travel on Tuesday 12 May 2015

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If you’re looking to set your eyes on some serious street art – street art where some of the world’s best artists come to play – you don’t have to travel to New York or Buenos Aires. Some of the very best street art is right in Melbourne’s backyard. And by backyard I mean smack bang in the heart of Melbourne’s CBD.

Welcome to Hosier Lane, a cobbled stone laneway just off Flinders Street, where art overtakes everything.

This is much more than a place to tag. Hosier Lane is actually a well-recognised landmark of the city, and in The Age writer Chris Johnston’s words, is a ‘postmodern confluence of art forms’. That’s big fancy words for serious art.

Expect to spend a few hours wandering up and down the laneway on any given visit. You’ll find the work of iconic artists Sophia Argiriou, Adnate, Ha-Ha, Psalm, and Vexta, all competing for your attention with their extravagant murals and colourful sculpture work lining the alleyway.

But here’s the best part: the art is continuously changing at Hosier Lane. There’s a beautiful life cycle that comes with street art – one artist will create a masterpiece, and after it has been admired and critiqued, another piece will appear in its place. So you can visit Hosier Lane one week, come back another week, and you’ll have an entirely different experience.

And if you’re really lucky, you’ll see some of Australia’s best street artists creating those vibrant masterpieces right before your eyes.

Create your own Melbourne Playlist here!

But that’s not the only place to get your Melbourne street art fix. Check out these other inner-city locations for more:

Caledonian Lane
Caledonian Lane

Running between Little Bourke Street and Lonsdale Street in the CBD, you’ll find this mini street art haven in the most unsuspecting location. Mosey on past the delivery trucks and dumpsters for an incredible look at some of the best stenciling and free-hand street art in the city.

Union Lane
Union Lane

Take a detour before you hit the stores at Bourke Street Mall for this jam-packed ground-to-sky street art extravaganza. The art of Union Lane was originally created by 50 young artists and takes up 550 square metres of space that’s hard to look away from.

AC/DC Lane
ACDC Lane

You can’t take a trip to Melbourne’s CBD without stopping by AC/DC Lane. Come here to pay tribute to your favourite Aussie band (AC/DC, of course) and to soak up the raw and gritty atmosphere of 70’s rock ‘n roll.

Croft Alley
Croft Alley

In the heart of Melbourne’s Chinatown, Croft Alley offers a paradise of colour, and of course, major talent. You’ll want to spend a while here – with a camera – to take in all the murals that are stacked together like an enormous jigsaw puzzle.

Hosier-Lane

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David Glaser

David Glaser, atonal composer extraordinare. His work fits into modern urban montage of sound and rhythm.

Sirius (2012), for violin, viola, cello and piano by New York-based composer David Glaser, is the second in a series of compositions for string combinations and piano. The work reflects the composer's recent interest in the fantasy, a genre of Elizabethan viol consort music that alternates polyphonic passages with homophonic sections. A single movement work, Sirius is a sonic collection of colors that at times sounds other-worldly, especially during the muted violin and viola passages. Special effects such as the plucking of the piano strings and loud pizzicatos can sound gratuitous in the hands of less skilled composers, however Glaser uses them all with purpose. The ensemble effortlessly and beautifully passed the lines of vivid tonal colors back and forth and each had an opportunity to share the conducting responsibilities.