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October 2014

Not All Daily Rainfall Records Are Impressive

Weather_vangogh_umbrellas

 

Since New York's weather records go back to 1872 one might think that rainfall records for each day of the year would be substantial amounts, i.e., at least three inches, but that's not the case.  For example, on Oct. 22, 2014 a nor'easter brought 1.51" of rain, which was a record for the date.  And although it was a significant amount it hardly seemed worthy of a record.  In fact, fifty-nine days have rainfall records that are for amounts less than 1.50", with nearly two dozen of them more than 100 years old. 

 

Unimpressed

 

The most unimpressive record amounts of precipitation are found in January (thirteen days) and May (nine days).  October is the only month in which all record amounts are above 1.50".  (Seventy-five dates report more than three inches of rain for their record amounts.)

 

Until 2014 the most rain to ever fall on April 30 had been just 0.89", but then 4.97" poured down - now that's a record!  This left two dates with record amounts less than one inch - 0.86" on Sept. 9 and 0.91" on April 29.

 

The chart below shows the ten smallest daily amounts of precipitation that are records.  The most recent was on Feb. 8, 2013, when just 1.15" of precipitation qualified as a record (much of it fell as snow).  And the most recent occurrence of a low-record amount being displaced by a much greater amount was on July 8, 2021, when 2.06" broke the 1964 record of 1.05".  (And on March 14, 2017, 1.97" of rain easily erased the 1956 record of 1.02".)

 

SMALLEST RAIN AMOUNTS
THAT ARE DAILY RECORDS
(As of Aug. 2021)
     
Date Amount Year
     
Sept 9 0.86 1902
April 29     0.89 1909
June 8 1.02 1900
Jan 29 1.03 1990
May 17 1.05 1989
April 11    1.10    1913
Nov 30 1.11 1928
June 15 1.13 1915
June 11 1.14 1911
Feb 8 1.15 2013
     
     

 


 

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Autumn Warm Spells - When Summer Keeps Hangin' On

Sheep.meadow

 

Although the general public often refers to warm spells in the fall as "Indian Summer," most occur before the first frost arrives (which, compared to the suburbs, comes weeks later to Manhattan/Central Park).  This analysis goes back to 1950 and looks at warm spells that have occurred mostly in October and November (with some beginning in late September).  For my purposes I focused on those that were at least four days in length.

 

 

LENGTHIEST

Two-thirds of the years since 1950 have had warm spells of four or more days (including the ten of the eleven years between 2010 and 2020).  Seventeen years had two or more, with 1953 experiencing four.  There have been ten warm spells that lasted ten days or more, the most recent being in the autumn of 2006.  The lengthiest was twenty-one days, which has occurred twice, in 1959 and 1984.

 

MOST ABOVE AVERAGE

There have been thirty-nine warm spells in autumn that averaged ten degrees above average or more (based on daily mean temperature).  The five-day heat wave of Sept. 22-26, 1970 was the most above average, +18 degrees, with four of the five days experiencing highs in the 90s. 

 

LENGTHIEST AUTUMN WARM SPELLS 
(SINCE 1950)
           
    # of Average Degrees
 Year Dates Days High Low Above
1959 Sept 21-Oct 11 21 81 65 +11
1984 Oct 11-31 21 70 57 + 8
1973 Sept 27-Oct 15 19 74 57 + 6
1995 Oct 2-14 13 76 58 + 7
1986 Sept 23-Oct 4 12 79 64 + 8
1979 Nov 18-28 11 65 52 +14
1994 Oct 30-Nov 9 11 69 52 + 9
1990 Oct 6-15 10 80 65 +13
2006 Nov 8-17 10 63 53 +10
1970 Oct 6-15 10 74 60 + 9
           
           
WARM SPELLS WITH GREATEST DEPARTURE
FROM AVERAGE
           
    # of Average Degrees
 Year Dates Days High Low Above 
 1970 Sept 22-26 5 90 72 +18
 1950 Oct 29-Nov 2 5 79 58 +17
 2020     Nov 6-11 6 73 58 +16
 1979 Oct 20-23 4 81 65 +16
 1991 Nov 19-23 5 67 54 +16
 1954 Oct 10-15 6 82 64 +15
 1961 Nov 3-6 4 73 59 +15
 1963 Oct 24-27 4 79 57 +15
 1979 Nov 18-28 11 65 52 +14
 1971 Oct 26-Nov 3 9 72 60 +14
 1975 Nov 2-10 9 72 57 +14
 2007 Oct 3-9       7     82     66      +14

 

 

 

 

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September 2014 Weather Recap: Dry & Warm

Sept2014calendar

September 2014 began and ended with significantly warmer than average temperatures.  Sept. 1-6 was 8.5 degrees above average while Sept. 26-30 was +7.5.  Meanwhile, the days in between (Sept. 7-25) were 1.5 cooler than average.  For the entire month, September was 1.7 degrees above average, with a dozen days five degrees or more above average.  This was the mildest September in three years, and the 35th mildest among all Septembers since records began in 1869. 

 

The warm spell between Aug. 31 thru Sept. 6 was the longest stretch of warm weather all year (every day had a high of 86° or warmer), and included the hottest day of the year, Sept. 2, which had a high/low of 92°/77° (thirteen degrees above average).  And the fifteen-day streak of 80-degree (or warmer) days between Aug. 24 to Sept. 7 was also the lengthiest of the year.

 

Since 1960, only September 2005 was drier than this September, as just 1.21" of rain fell.  Since records began, this ranks as twelfth driest September.  (Sept. 2005 is tied for second place, with just 0.48" measured.)  The "rainiest" day was on 9/25, when 0.32" was measured in Central Park.

 

No.rain

 

August and September's combined rainfall of 3.46" was five inches below average, and the least to fall during these two months since 1995.  Among all years on record this two-month combo ranks eleventh.  

 

Finally, this was New York's most above average month, temperature-wise, since last October (which was 3.3 degrees above average), and the driest, also since last October (which had just 0.36" of rain).

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